The Secret Of Skinwalker Ranch

Some have called it a supernatural place. Others have deemed it “cursed.” Terry Sherman got so spooked by the happenings on his new cattle ranch that 18 months after moving his family of four to the property now known by many as “Skinwalker Ranch” in northeastern Utah, he sold the 512-acre parcel away.

He and his wife Gwen shared their chilling experiences with a local reporter in June 1996: They’d seen mysterious crop circles, the Shermans said, and UFOs, and the systematic and repeated mutilation of their cattle—in an oddly surgical and bloodless manner. Within three months of the story’s publication, Las Vegas real estate magnate and UFO enthusiast Robert Bigelow bought the property for $200,000.

Under the name the National Institute for Discovery Science, Bigelow set up round-the-clock surveillance of the ranch, hoping to get to the bottom of the paranormal claims. But while that surveillance yielded a book, Hunt for the Skinwalker: Science Confronts the Unexplained at a Remote Ranch in Utah, in which several of the researchers claimed to have seen paranormal activities, they were unable to capture any meaningful physical evidence supporting the Shermans’ incredible stories.

The ranch was resold to Adamantium Real Estate, which has since applied to trademark the name “Skinwalker Ranch.”

Had the Shermans been lying about what they saw? Or under the spell of a collective delusion? Without evidence, the stories they told are difficult to believe, but they’re hardly unique. The Uinta Basin of eastern Utah has been such a hotbed of paranormal sightings over the years that some extraterrestrial enthusiasts have deemed it “UFO Alley.” “You can’t throw a rock in Southern Utah without hitting somebody who’s been abducted,” local filmmaker Trent Harris told the Deseret News.

Indeed, according to Hunt for the Skinwalker, odd objects have been spotted overhead since the first European explorers arrived: In 1776, Franciscan missionary Silvestre Vélez de Escalante wrote about strange fireballs appearing over his campfire in El Rey. And before the Europeans, of course, indigenous peoples occupied the Uinta Basin. Today, “Skinwalker Ranch” abuts the Uintah and Ouray Indian Reservation of the Ute Tribe.

Were the Shermans seeing things that nearby Native Americans had taken note of centuries before?

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The Legend Of The Mothman

On November 12, 1966, in Clendenin, West Virginia, a group of gravediggers working in a cemetery spotted something strange.

They glanced up from their work as something huge soared over their heads. It was a massive figure that was moving rapidly from tree to tree. The gravediggers would later describe this figure as a “brown human being.”

This was the first reported sighting of what would come to be known as the Mothman, an elusive creature that remains as mysterious as it was on the night that a few frightened witnesses first laid eyes on it.

The Legend Of The Mothman In Point Pleasant, West Virginia

Just three days after the gravediggers’ initial report, in nearby Point Pleasant, West Virginia, two couples noticed a white-winged creature about six or seven feet tall standing in front of the car that they were all sitting in.

Eyewitnesses Roger Scarberry and Steve Mallett told the local paper, The Point Pleasant Register, that the beast had bright red eyes about six inches apart, a wingspan of 10 feet, and the apparent urge to avoid the bright headlights of the car.

According to the witnesses, this creature was able to fly at incredible speeds — perhaps as fast as 100 miles per hour. All of them agreed that the beast was a clumsy runner on the ground.

They knew this only because it allegedly chased their vehicle to the outskirts of town in the air, then scuttled into a nearby field and disappeared.

Knowing how absurd this must have sounded to a local paper in a small, Appalachian community in the 1960s, Scarberry insisted that the apparition couldn’t have been a figment of his imagination.

He assured the paper, “If I had seen it while by myself, I wouldn’t have said anything, but there were four of us who saw it.”

The Infamous Silver Bridge Collapse

On December 15, 1967, just over a year after the first Mothman sighting, traffic was bad on the Silver Bridge. Originally built in 1928 to connect Point Pleasant, West Virginia, to Gallipolis, Ohio, the bridge was packed with cars.

This placed a strain on the bridge, which had been built in a time when cars were lighter. The Model T had weighed just 1,500 pounds — a modest sum compared to the 1967 average for a car: 4,000 pounds.

The bridge’s engineers hadn’t been particularly imaginative, nor had they been especially cautious, while creating this structure. The bridge’s design featured very little redundancy, meaning that if one part failed, there was almost nothing in place to prevent other parts from failing as well.

And on that cold December day, that was exactly what happened.

Without warning, a single eyebar near the top of the bridge on the Ohio side cracked. The chain snapped, and the bridge, its careful equilibrium disturbed, fell to pieces, plunging cars and pedestrians into the icy water of the Ohio River below.

Forty-six people died, either by drowning or being crushed by the wreckage.

Following the Mothman sightings, the bridge collapse was the second terrible and bizarre thing to put Point Pleasant on the map in a year’s time. So it didn’t take long for some to connect the two.

In 1975, author John Keel conflated the Mothman sightings and the bridge disaster while creating his book The Mothman Prophecies. He also incorporated UFO activity. His story took hold, and the town soon became iconic among conspiracy theorists, ufologists, and fans of the paranormal.

The Legend Continues To Grow

Since those initial sightings. There have been multiple sightings around the world. Sightings that typically come before a major disaster. Or so the story goes.

If you’d like a more in depth analysis of the various legends and stories surrounding the Mothman. Watch this video

The Legend Of Skinwalker Ranch

Skinwalker Ranch (also called Sherman Ranch or UFO Ranch) is a large property near the small town of Ballard, Utah that is almost 500 acres in size. It boarders the Ute Indian Reservation.

The Utes will not enter the area known as Skinwalker Ranch because they believe it is fertile territory for skinwalkers: “The Utes take this very seriously. They think the Skinwalkers are powerful spirits that are here because of a curse that was put on them generations ago by the Navajos. And the center of the whole legend is this ranch. The Utes say the ranch is “the path of the skinwalker.” Tribe members are strictly forbidden from setting foot on the property. It’s been that way for a long time.”

Beginning in the 1950’s the area around Skinwalker Ranch has been a hotbed of UFO activity (according to locals).

In 1994 Skinwalker Ranch became well known when Terry and Gwen Sherman (the names are popular pseudonyms for the real family) and their children purchased the property only to be driven from the home after two years of increasingly terrifying paranormal events.

When the family moved in, they found deadbolts on doors and windows that puzzled them. Some of the doors and windows had deadbolts on both the inside and the outside. They also found large chains outside that looked like they may be for the purpose of restraining a heavy animal.

While they lived on the ranch the family experienced multiple cattle mutilations, crop circles, hearing voices calling from nowhere, inanimate objects moving before their eyes, UFOs and seeing strange birds and other animals on the property.

In one instance, the family saw a wolf attacking one of their cattle. They shot the wolf multiple times with a handgun and the wolf did not react to the gunshots at all and appeared unharmed while it continued to attack the cattle. Eventually after being shot six times, the wolf ran off and eventually vanished.

They saw a UFO larger than “two football fields” and apparent alien figures “over seven feet tall”.

In two years the family lost 20% of their heard to cattle mutilation.

In 1996 the family vacated their home.

Later in 1996 billionaire Robert Bigelow (he owns Budget Suites) bought the ranch for $200,000 and made it the home of a paranormal research group, The National Institute for the Discovery of Science, which operated until 2004. The organization is later replaced by the Bigelow Aerospace Advanced Space Studies.

Bigelow’s findings were that the UFOs seen in the area were “not consistent” with current military aircrafts.

After not being able to actively replicate studies since such activity cannot be replicated regularly, Bigelow decided to sell the property to a company called Ademantium holdings.

However, when researching this “company,” I found that no such company exists. So we may not truly know who owns the property now. But they have surveillance equipment, a gate and 24 hour armed guards at the entrances of the property. So it seems like whatever they’re researching sure must be important.

If you’re interested in this topic watch the video below. It goes way more in depth on the history and activity of skinwalker ranch.

The Secret Of Skinwalker Ranch

Some have called it a supernatural place. Others have deemed it “cursed.” Terry Sherman got so spooked by the happenings on his new cattle ranch that 18 months after moving his family of four to the property now known by many as “Skinwalker Ranch” in northeastern Utah, he sold the 512-acre parcel away. He and… Continue Reading →

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The Mystery Of The Dyatlov Pass Incident

In January of 1959, ten hikers, all but one students at the Urals Polytechnic Institute in Sverdlovsk, began a hike into the Ural Mountains. They were led by Igor Dyatlov. All ten were experienced hikers. They planned a three week trip with a return planned for February 12th. One hiker, Yuri Yudin, left early in the trip, on January 28th, due to a flare up of sciatica. He had made it to the final leg of the trip getting out to the Ural mountains by sled, but had to ride back on the sled to return home. By this time, he’d already taken two train rides, a bus ride, and then the sled ride with the other hikers to get to the place where they would begin their treacherous journey through the mountains in the winter. He was disappointed to leave, but this decision would ultimately save his life.

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